OpenStack 16 (Train) Lab Installation and Configuration Guide for Hetzner Root Servers

rdo

Overview

In this article we will focus on installing and configuring OpenStack Train using RDO and the packstack installer. RDO is a community platform around Red Hat’s Enterprise OpenStack Distribution. It allows you to test the latest OpenStack capabilities on a stable platform such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) or CentOS. This guide will take you through setting up Hetzner root server, preparing environment for OpenStack, installing the OpenStack Train release, adding a floating ip subnet through OVS, configuring networking, security groups, flavors, images and are other OpenStack related services. The outcome is a working OpenStack environment based on the Train release that you can use as a baseline for testing your applications using OpenStack capabilities. The installation will create an all-in-one deployment however you can use this guide to create a multi-node deployment as well.

Continue reading

Automated Infrastructure in the On-Premise Datacenter – OpenShift 4.2 on OpenStack 15 (Stein)

OpenShift-LogoType.svg heavy-plus-signopenstack-logo

Overview

In this article we start a new journey, automated infrastructure in the on-premise datacenter. We will deploy OpenShift 4.2 on OpenStack. As I am sure you are aware, OpenShift is Red Hat’s enterprise kubernetes platform. Kubernetes is of course the brains but by itself is not a platform. OpenShift brings with kubernetes, monitoring, aggregate logging, container registry, security, automated deployment/upgrade, developer experience, huge middleware tooling built around JBoss, serverless frameworks, ISTIO (service mesh), CI/CD integration and the key word “ENTERPRISE“.

Continue reading

OpenStack 15 (Stein) Lab Installation and Configuration Guide for Hetzner Root Servers

rdo

Overview

In this article we will focus on installing and configuring OpenStack Stein using RDO and the packstack installer. RDO is a community platform around Red Hat’s Enterprise OpenStack Distribution. It allows you to test the latest OpenStack capabilities on a stable platform such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) or CentOS. This guide will take you through setting up Hetzner root server, preparing environment for OpenStack, installing the OpenStack Stein release, adding a floating ip subnet through OVS, configuring networking, security groups, flavors, images and are other OpenStack related services. The outcome is a working OpenStack environment based on the Stein release that you can use as a baseline for testing your applications using OpenStack capabilities. The installation will create an all-in-one deployment however you can use this guide to create a multi-node deployment as well.

Continue reading

Powerful but Simple CI/CD with Azure DevOps and Go

azuredevops-2x

Overview

Microsoft has wasted little time getting value out of their GitHub acquisition. They have now fully integrated GitHub and authentication into an already powerful DevOps platform called “Azure DevOps”. I have until this moment had zero enjoyment, setting up and maintaining CI/CD tooling usually involving some form of our dear butler, Jenkins. Nothing wrong with our old Jenkins but let’s face it, he is just overhead at this point, better to just put him to rest, he has earned it.

Azure DevOps has the following value:

  • It’s in the cloud, consumed as-a-service
  • Completely Integrated with GitHub
  • It is free
  • Authentication using GitHub user
  • Don’t need to use it with Azure
  • Supports basically every language, I am doing CI/CD with Go
  • Simple yaml to configure no Groovy/DML Jenkins horror
  • Yaml pipeline files auto-generated for your language (just needs minor tweaks)
  • Your code is built, unit tests are run, you can do acceptance tests and it is setup in a few minutes

Continue reading

Building A Niche Cloud: A Pragmatic Approach

Teamwork-ants-building-a-house

source: https://innolectinc.com/how-smart-is-your-team/teamwork-ants-building-a-house/

Overview

Before getting started you might want to read about the birth of the niche cloud in the first part of this two part series.

We have all heard the saying, you cannot teach an old dog new tricks. Yes that is true, but we aren’t thankfully dogs. Learning to do something new of course, requires an open mind-set and a desire for change. Many organizations are getting left out of digital disruption these days because they keep falling back on old outdated ideas, behaviors and habits. Our minds are so full, so occupied and so tired we simply cannot grasp or don’t have the energy for anything new. We spend our time applying what is new to what we know, which is old.

In this article lets reset our minds and look at an approach to build a niche cloud from the ground up. Instead of pealing back the onion we will apply layer after layer until we have the onion itself. Of course I realize there is a lot more and this article is just scratching at the surface, nevertheless it is an approach, a basic rule-set and guideline for getting started.

Continue reading

OpenStack 14 (Rocky) Lab Installation and Configuration Guide for Hetzner Root Servers

rdo

Overview

In this article we will focus on installing and configuring OpenStack Rocky using RDO and the packstack installer. RDO is a community platform around Red Hat’s Enterprise OpenStack Distribution. It allows you to test the latest OpenStack capabilities on a stable platform such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) or CentOS. This guide will take you through setting up Hetzner root server, preparing environment for OpenStack, installing the OpenStack Rocky release, adding a floating ip subnet through OVS, configuring networking, security groups, flavors, images and are other OpenStack related services. The outcome is a working OpenStack environment based on the Rocky release that you can use as a baseline for testing your applications using OpenStack capabilities. The installation will create an all-in-one deployment however you can use this guide to create a multi-node deployment as well.
Continue reading

The Birth of the Niche Cloud?

1200px-Flightless_Dung_Beetle_Circellium_Bachuss,_Addo_Elephant_National_Park,_South_Africa

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecological_niche

Overview

In this article we will take a step back from my typical technical discussions and how-to guides to think about the path that lies ahead of us, in our industry. Today we have a very polarizing environment, similar in fact to the US political system.  On one side you have extremely customized on-premise environments that serve specific purpose or business niches but on the whole are hard, if not impossible to maintain and very costly. On the other side you have generic public cloud, infrastructure that always works (well almost, nothing is perfect), scales and is available at click of a button with predictable pricing structure but doesn’t fit specific purpose by default.

The industry has for many years recognized these worlds were growing further apart and defined the solution as hybrid cloud management to manage them or even bridge the worlds. But gluing two polarized worlds together was only ever destined to fail. Hybrid cloud, which often drags with it the management, is dead. I think more are interested in talking about multi-cloud and I see multi-cloud replacing what hybrid cloud once stood for. I see container platforms providing the glue, management platforms once promised.

The same battle purpose built vs generic repeats itself over and over in all facets of our lives. The truth is we need both. In this article we will explore a new thought or idea, called niche clouds which could provide a purpose built cloud of the future.

Continue reading