OpenShift Operator SDK: Getting Started Guide

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Overview

In this article we will introduce the concept of operators and provide a hands-on guide to building your very first operator. I will show you how to create a development environment with everything needed. Using the Operator SDK we will learn how to create boilerplate code, build and deploy an operator. A followup article is also planned that will go deeper into operator development so stay tuned!

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Getting Started with Volume Snapshots in OpenShift 4 and OpenShift Container Storage

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Overview

Volume snapshots are the ability to create snapshots of persistent volumes in kubernetes using the container storage interface (csi) driver. The csi driver allows storage solutions to integrate into kubernetes and expose their technologies. Snapshots of course, have been and are a key technology when discussing data workloads because they enable backup/restore seamlessly, on-demand and in a split second. Even though volume snapshots are in the alpha stage, several storage providers already have integrations, including one that is very interesting, Ceph RDB.

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Automated Infrastructure in the On-Premise Datacenter – OpenShift 4.2 on OpenStack 15 (Stein)

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Overview

In this article we start a new journey, automated infrastructure in the on-premise datacenter. We will deploy OpenShift 4.2 on OpenStack. As I am sure you are aware, OpenShift is Red Hat’s enterprise kubernetes platform. Kubernetes is of course the brains but by itself is not a platform. OpenShift brings with kubernetes, monitoring, aggregate logging, container registry, security, automated deployment/upgrade, developer experience, huge middleware tooling built around JBoss, serverless frameworks, ISTIO (service mesh), CI/CD integration and the key word “ENTERPRISE“.

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The Coffee is Getting Cold, It’s Time to GO – Getting Started Building Microservices

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Overview

Java has been around a really, really long time. Certainly it continues to evolve and has evolved. Java has always been a “can do anything” programming language. It has more frameworks and middleware than there are stars in the sky. It is portable anywhere and of course probably 8 out of 10 developers today know Java to some degree. Given all of this though is Java the path forward?

Looking forward I think the clear trend is microservices and beyond. Therefore the question is a lot simpler, is Java the best path forward for microservices?

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Container Native Virtualization (Kubevirt): The Future for Virtual Machines is Here!

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Overview

Immediately after Solomon Hykes first showed Docker to the public at PyCon in 2013, in his now famous “docker run demo”, IT folk started asking, what does this mean for virtualization? We only spent the previous 10-15 years virtualizing, seemingly everything, so understandably people were slightly apprehensive. Industries had been built and careers established, clearly virtualization would be an important part of the future and not simply replaced, right?

In this article we will aim to understand the value of virtualization in a container-driven world, explore the current virtualization capabilities in Kubernetes and get started with Container Native Virtualization (Kubevirt) using Red Hat’s Kubernetes enterprise distribution, OpenShift.

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It’s a PaaS: Vanilla Kubernetes vs OpenShift on OpenStack Lab Setup Guide

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Overview

Often a lot of people seem to confuse Kubernetes with OpenShift or a platform-as-a-service (PaaS). Kubernetes is of course on it’s own, not. It is an orchestration layer or technology for containers but a lot is missing to really call it a platform. OpenShift is Red Hat enterprise Kubernetes platform. It contains Kubernetes but also a whole lot more which make it a true platform. So which is right for you? It depends a lot on your requirements and what you are trying to achieve. The purpose of this article is to setup an environment for running a workshop that compares the Kubernetes experience with OpenShift in order to gain more insight and understanding in what you may actually need. Many people sit down with slides or at a whiteboard, but I really find that is not adequate and you really need to experience it, first hand.

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OpenShift: Getting Started with the Service Broker

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Overview

In this article we will look at the OpenShift service broker, understand how to integrate external services into OpenShift and even create a custom broker. First before we begin a big thanks to Marek Jelen and Paul Morie, Red Hatters who both helped me understand the service broker in greater detail.

Obviously if you are reading this article you already understand microservices, containers and why it is all so incredible awesome on OpenShift. Of course everything should be in a container but unfortunately it is going to take a while to get there. As we start dissecting and breaking down the monolithic architectures of the past, likely there will be a mix of lightweight services running in containers on OpenShift and other more heavy services (databases, ESBs, etc) running outside. In addition while the service catalog in OpenShift is vast, even allowing you to add your own custom services for anything that can run in OpenShift as-a-container using a template, there will be the need, especially with public cloud to connect to external services. Both of these use cases, on-premise external services and off-premise cloud services really made it obvious that a service broker and more robust service catalog was needed. Originally OpenShift did not have a service broker so you couldn’t easily consume external services. All that existed was the service catalog and templates, so every service had to be a container running on OpenShift. Thankfully other companies also saw a need for an open service abstraction and the Open Service Broker API was born as an opensource project.

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