Keep Your Servers and Run Your Applications Forever with Red Hat Virtualization powered by KVM

KVM-tuchaplus_signWindow4NTserver

Overview

This article was written by myself and fellow colleague Götz Rieger. Often one of the most challenging problems we are facing today is both absorbing and leading change. Software defined-everything has taken over and is leveling the playing field, de-marginalizing staunch competitive advantages and nothing is safe anymore. Develop great applications and thrive or become irrelevant is the mantra facing many organizations. In such environments it is important to innovate constantly, delivering new capabilities at an ever increasing speed. In order to do so, new practices (DevOps), values (Agile) and of course technology (Containers) are being implemented.

Today it seems almost everyone is focused on “the new” software-defined whatever, when in reality change happens at different levels and different speeds. Gartner tried to summarize this with “mode 1 vs mode 2” but that trivializes things too far. It comes down to application lifecycles which dictates dependency on change.  What if certain software doesn’t need to change? What if it has a purpose and is already doing it’s job function? What if the software cannot be ported to a new operating platform? What do you do then? The answer surprisingly, is maybe nothing? Maybe we let those applications live well beyond their intended support lifecycles. Consider the old programs in the Matrix, some found a way to survive and were not killed. These were also some of the most important, powerful programs.

Virtualization has enabled us to let x86 platforms essentially run forever or at least well beyond their support lifecycles (hardware and software). If we consider outdated Cobol applications on UNIX or Windows platforms like NT, XP and 2003; they haven’t been supported for years. Applications running on these platforms might are not able to migrate for whatever reason, else they would have already done so. If we think about it, this is in fact a very valid use case for virtualization. There are of course other considerations that are important, like isolation (since these applications are not receiving patches) but assuming that is handled, why not? If it ain’t broken and doesn’t need to change, why fix it?

In this article we will look at how to run Windows NT Server (an operating system that hasn’t been supported since 2004) on KVM and Red Hat Virtualization powered by KVM.

Continue reading

Explaining OpenStack Cinder Types and Scheduler

openstack-logo-2016

Overview

OpenStack Cinder is responsible for handling block storage in the context of OpenStack. Cinder provides a standard API and interface that allows storage companies to create their own drivers in order to integrate storage capabilities into OpenStack in a consistent way. Each storage pool exposed to OpenStack Cinder is a backend and you can have many storage backends. You can also have many of the same kind of storage backends. In this article we will look at two advanced features Cinder provides: types and the scheduler.

Cinder types essentially allow us to label Cinder storage backends. This allows for building out storage services that have expected characteristics and capabilities. The Cinder driver exposes those storage capabilities to Cinder.

The Cinder scheduler is responsible for deciding where to create Cinder volumes when we have more than one of the same kind of storage backend. This is done by looking at the filter rules in order to identify the most appropriate storage backend. More about filter rules can be found here.

Continue reading

CloudForms Installation and Configuration Guide for Red Hat Virtualization

manageiq-logo-glyph

Overview

In this article we will deploy CloudForms 4.2 on Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHV). We will also show how to configure CloudForms in order to properly manage a RHV cluster and it’s hosts as well as virtual machines.

Before you begin a RHV cluster is needed. If you haven’t set one up, here is a guide on how to build a basic two node RHV cluster.

Continue reading

RHV 4.1 Lab Installation and Configuration Guide

redhatvirtual-8648b589ea764898

Overview

In this article we will setup a Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHV) environment. RHV is based on upstream opensource projects KVM and Ovirt. RHV is composed of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL which includes KVM) and Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Management (RHV-M), based on Ovirt. As of this article the latest version is RHV 4.1.

RHV has of late become very interesting to customers looking for alternatives to VMware. Below are a few reasons why you should be interested in RHV:

  • 100% opensource no proprietary code and no proprietary licencing.
  • Best Hypervisor for running Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).
  • Integrated and built with RHEL, uses SELinux to secure Hypervisor.
  • RHV leads VMware in SPECvirt performance and price per performance (last results 2013).
  • RHV scales vertically and performs extremely well on 4 or even 8 socket servers.
  • All features are included in RHV subscription, no licensing for extra capabilities.
  • KVM is future proof and is the defacto standard for OpenStack and modern virtualizations platforms.

Continue reading

OpenStack 10 (Newton) Lab Installation and Configuration Guide

rdo

Overview

In this article we will focus on installing and configuring OpenStack Newton using RDO and the packstack installer. RDO is a community platform around Red Hat’s OpenStack Platform. It allows you to test the latest OpenStack capabilities on a stable platform such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) or CentOS. This guide will take you through installing the OpenStack Liberty release, configuring networking, security groups, flavors, images and are other OpenStack related services. The outcome is a working OpenStack environment based on the Newton release that you can use as a baseline for testing your applications with OpenStack capabilities.
Continue reading

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) – Management Options

oVirt_300x100

Overview

RHEV has two separate distinct layers, the hypervisor itself and management. The hypervisor layer, RHEV-H is of course built on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and utilizes KVM for the hypervisor technology. RHEV-H can be configured using pre-built RHEV-H image or using standard RHEL. The management layer, Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Management (RHEV-M) provides management for a multi-hypervisor environment and uses concepts such as datacenters, clusters, networks and storage domains to describe virtualization resources. In this article we will focus on options for configuring RHEV-M. The upstream opensource project behind RHEV-M is oVirt. There are two options as of RHEV 3.5 for configuring RHEV-M, standalone or hosted engine.

Below are other articles you may find of interest relating to RHEV:

Continue reading

HOWTO: OpenStack Deployment using TripleO and the Red Hat OpenStack Director

ooo

Overview

In this article we will look at how to deploy an OpenStack cloud using TripleO, the upstream project from the Red Hat OpenStack Director. Regardless of what OpenStack distribution you are using OpenStack is essentially OpenStack. Everyone has the same code-base to work with. The main differences between distributions are around what OpenStack projects are part of distribution, how it is supported and the deployment of the distribution. Every distribution has their own OpenStack deployment tool. Clearly deployments differ as they are based on support decisions each distribution makes. However many distributions have created their own proprietary installers. Shouldn’t the OpenStack community unite around a common installer? What would be better than using OpenStack to deploy OpenStack? Why should OpenStack administrators have to learn separate proprietary tooling? Why should we be creating unnecessary vendor lock-in for OpenStack’s deployment tooling? Installing OpenStack is one thing but what about upgrade and life-cycle management?
Continue reading