OpenStack 10 (Newton) Lab Installation and Configuration Guide

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Overview

In this article we will focus on installing and configuring OpenStack Newton using RDO and the packstack installer. RDO is a community platform around Red Hat’s OpenStack Platform. It allows you to test the latest OpenStack capabilities on a stable platform such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) or CentOS. This guide will take you through installing the OpenStack Liberty release, configuring networking, security groups, flavors, images and are other OpenStack related services. The outcome is a working OpenStack environment based on the Newton release that you can use as a baseline for testing your applications with OpenStack capabilities.
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Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) – Management Options

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Overview

RHEV has two separate distinct layers, the hypervisor itself and management. The hypervisor layer, RHEV-H is of course built on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and utilizes KVM for the hypervisor technology. RHEV-H can be configured using pre-built RHEV-H image or using standard RHEL. The management layer, Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Management (RHEV-M) provides management for a multi-hypervisor environment and uses concepts such as datacenters, clusters, networks and storage domains to describe virtualization resources. In this article we will focus on options for configuring RHEV-M. The upstream opensource project behind RHEV-M is oVirt. There are two options as of RHEV 3.5 for configuring RHEV-M, standalone or hosted engine.

Below are other articles you may find of interest relating to RHEV:

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HOWTO: OpenStack Deployment using TripleO and the Red Hat OpenStack Director

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Overview

In this article we will look at how to deploy an OpenStack cloud using TripleO, the upstream project from the Red Hat OpenStack Director. Regardless of what OpenStack distribution you are using OpenStack is essentially OpenStack. Everyone has the same code-base to work with. The main differences between distributions are around what OpenStack projects are part of distribution, how it is supported and the deployment of the distribution. Every distribution has their own OpenStack deployment tool. Clearly deployments differ as they are based on support decisions each distribution makes. However many distributions have created their own proprietary installers. Shouldn’t the OpenStack community unite around a common installer? What would be better than using OpenStack to deploy OpenStack? Why should OpenStack administrators have to learn separate proprietary tooling? Why should we be creating unnecessary vendor lock-in for OpenStack’s deployment tooling? Installing OpenStack is one thing but what about upgrade and life-cycle management?
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OpenStack Tips and Tricks

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Overview

In this article we will look at some common OpenStack Kilo configuration optimizations and other tricks. This is by no means a comprehensive guide, just things I have stumbled across that if documented would have saved me time. I continue to update this blog with things I learned. If you have some valuable tips or tricks then let me know so I can add those?
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OpenStack Kilo Lab Installation and Configuration Guide

rdo

Overview

In this article we will focus on installing and configuring OpenStack Kilo using RDO and the packstack installer. RDO is a community platform around Red Hat’s OpenStack Platform. It allows you to test the latest OpenStack capabilities on a stable platform such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) or CentOS. This guide will take you through installing the OpenStack Kilo release, configuring networking, security groups, flavors, images and are other OpenStack related services. The outcome is a working OpenStack environment based on the Kilo release that you can use as a baseline for testing your applications with OpenStack capabilities. A big thanks to Red Hatter, Goetz Rieger who contributed some of this content.
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Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) – Hypervisor Host Options

Overview

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) has two options for running a hypervisor host: 1) use the RHEV-H host 2) use Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 or 7. Option 1 is similar to VMware ESXi, RHEV-H is an optimized OS for running Virtual Machines.  Option 2 allows you to configure a standard RHEL 6 or 7 host and add it to RHEV as a hypervisor. Continue reading

Enterprise OpenStack: RHEL OSP

Overview

As of today there are over eleven OpenStack services and more are coming. Each service has complete isolation from other services and that allows OpenStack to scale far beyond the reach of current computing platforms. However due to all these independent services, OpenStack can be very complicated to operationalize in enterprise environments.
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