Storage for Containers Using Ceph RBD – Part IV

Shipping containers

Overview

In this article we will look at how to integrate Ceph RBD (Rados Block Device) with Kubernetes and OpenShift. Ceph is of course a scale-out software-defined storage system that provides block, file and object storage. It focuses primarily on cloud-storage use cases. Providing storage for Kubernetes and OpenShift is just one of many use cases that fit very well with Ceph.

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Storage for Containers using NetApp SolidFire– Part VI

Shipping containers

Overview

In this article we will look at how you can configure and dynamically provision NetApp SolidFire Storage for containerized applications in a Kubernetes/OpenShift environment. This article is a work from Kapil Arora (Cloud Platform Architect @NetApp).

NetApp recently released an open source project known as Trident, the first external storage provisioner for Kubernetes leveraging on-premises storage.

Trident enables the use of the new storage class concept in Kubernetes, acting as a provisioning controller that watches for PVCs (persistent volume requests) and creates them on-demand.

This means that when a pod requests storage from a storage class that Trident is responsible for, it will provision a volume that meets those requirements and make it available to the pod in real-time.

To learn more  check-out these  Trident videos.

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Storage for Containers using NetApp ONTAP NAS – Part V

Shipping containers

Overview

In this article we will look at how you can configure and dynamically provision ONTAP NAS Storage for containerized applications in a Kubernetes/OpenShift environment.

This article is a work from Kapil Arora (Cloud Platform Architect @NetApp).

NetApp recently released an open source project known as Trident, the first external storage provisioner for Kubernetes leveraging on-premises storage.

Trident enables the use of the new storage class concept in Kubernetes, acting as a provisioning controller that watches for PVCs (persistent volume requests) and creates them on-demand.

This means that when a pod requests storage from a storage class that Trident is responsible for, it will provision a volume that meets those requirements and make it available to the pod in real-time.

To learn more  check-out these  Trident videos.

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Storage for Containers using Container Native Storage – Part III

Shipping containers

Overview

In this article we will focus on a new area of storage for containers called Container Native Storage. This article is a collaboration between Daniel Messer (Technical Marketing Manager Storage @RedHat) and Keith Tenzer (Sr. Solutions Architect @RedHat).

So What is Container Native Storage?

Essentially container native storage or CNS is a hyper-converged approach to storage and compute in the context of containers. Each container host or node supplies both compute and storage allowing storage to be completely integrated or absorbed by the platform itself. A software-defined storage system running in containers on the platform, consumes disks provided by nodes and provides a cluster-wide storage abstraction layer. The software-defined storage system then provides capabilities such as high-availability, dynamic provisioning and general storage management. This enables DevOps from a storage perspective, allows storage to grow with the container platform and delivers a high level of efficiency.

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OpenShift Enterprise 3.4: all-in-one Lab Environment

Screenshot from 2016-08-04 14:40:07

Overview

In this article we will setup a OpenShift Enterprise 3.4 all-in-one configuration.

OpenShift has several different roles: masters, nodes, etcd and load balancers. An all-in-one setup means running all service on a single system. Since we are only using a single system a load balancer or ha-proxy won’t be configured. If you would like to read more about OpenShift I can recommend the following:

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OpenShift Enterprise 3.3: all-in-one Lab Environment with Jenkins Build Pipeline

Screenshot from 2016-08-04 14:40:07

Overview

In this article we will setup a OpenShift Enterprise 3.3 all-in-one configuration. We will also configure OpenShift router, registry, aggregate logging, metrics, CloudForms integration and finally an integrated jenkins build pipeline.

OpenShift has several different roles: masters, nodes, etcd and load balancers. An all-in-one setup means running all service on a single system. Since we are only using a single system, a load balancer or ha-proxy won’t be configured. If you would like to read more about OpenShift I can recommend the following:

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Enterprise Container Platform in the Cloud: OpenShift on Azure secured by Azure AD

msazurelogo plus_sign openshiftlogo

Overview

This article is a collaboration from Rolf Masuch (Microsoft) and Keith Tenzer (Red Hat). It is based on our work together in the field with enterprise customers.

In this article we will explore how to deploy a production ready OpenShift enterprise container platform on the Microsoft Azure Cloud. The entire deployment is completely automated using Ansible and ARM (Azure Resource Manager). Everything is template driven using APIs. The bennefit of this approach is the ability to build-up and tear-down a complete OpenShift environment in the Azure cloud before your coffee gets cold.

Since OpenShift already uses Ansible as its installation and configuration management tool, it made sense to stick with Ansible as opposed to using other tools such as Power Shell. A Red Hat colleague, Ivan McKinley created an Ansible playbook that builds out all the required Azure infrastructure components and integrates the existing OpenShift installation playbook. The result is an optimally configure OpenShift environment on the Azure Cloud. We have used this recipe to deploy real production Environments for customers and it leverages both Microsoft as well as Red Hat best practices.

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