OpenShift v3: Basic Release Deployment Scenarios

3d small people - Males with four puzzle together

source: http://snsoftwarelabs.com/

Overview

One of the hardest things companies struggle with today is release management. Of course many methodologies and even more tools or technologies exist, but how do we bring everything together and work across functional boundaries of an organization? A product release involves everyone in the company not just a single team. Many companies struggle with this and the result is a much slower innovation cycle. In the past this used to be something that at least wasn’t a deal breaker. Unfortunately that is no longer the case. Today companies live and die by their ability to not only innovate but release innovation. I would say innovating is the easy part, the ability to provide those innovations in a controlled fashion through products and services is the real challenge.
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OpenShift Enterprise 3.2: all-in-one Lab Environment

Screenshot from 2016-08-04 14:40:07

Overview

In this article we will setup a OpenShift Enterprise 3.2 all-in-one configuration. We will also setup the integration with CloudForms that allows additional management of OpenShift environments.

OpenShift has several different roles: masters, nodes, etcd and load balancers. An all-in-one setup means running all service on a single system. Since we are only using a single system a load balancer or ha-proxy won’t be configured. If you would like to read more about OpenShift I can recommend the following:

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Red Hat OpenStack Platform 8 Lab Configuration using OpenStack Director

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Overview

In this article we will look at how to deploy Red Hat OpenStack Platform 8 (Liberty) using Red Hat OpenStack Director. In a previous article we looked at how to deploy Red Hat OpenStack Platform 7 (Kilo). The first release of OpenStack Director was in OpenStack Platform 7 so this is the second release of OpenStack Director.

One of the main areas where distributions of course distinguish themselves is in regards to the installer. As you will see in this article, Red Hat’s installer, OpenStack Director is far more than just an installer, it is a lifecycle tool to manage the infrastructure for OpenStack. OpenStack Director is based on the upstream OpenStack foundation project TripleO. At this point, Red Hat is only distribution basing it’s installer on TripleO, hopefully that changes soon. All other distributions use either proprietary software or isolated, fragmented communities to build OpenStack installers. Beyond installing OpenStack, lifecycle management is mostly an afterthought. Installing OpenStack is of course the easiest thing you will do, it isn’t a big deal anymore. If your serious about OpenStack you will quickly realize things like updates, in-place upgrades, scaling, infrastructure blueprints and support lifecycles are far more critical.
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OpenStack Heat and Ansible – Automation Born in the Cloud

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Overview

In this article we will look at how Ansible can be leveraged within OpenStack to provide enhanced capabilities around software deployment. Before we get into the details lets understand the challenge. There are typically two layers of automation: provisioning and deployment. Provisioning is all about the underlying infrastructure a particular application might require. Deployment is about installing and configuring the application after the infrastructure exists. OpenStack Heat is the obvious choice for automating provisioning. Heat integrates with other OpenStack services and provides the brains, that bring OpenStack powered cloud to life. While Heat is great for provisioning infrastructure, software deployment is not one of its strengths and trying to orchestrate complex software deployments can be rather clunky. That is where Ansible comes into play and as you will see in this article, they fit together perfectly.
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OpenStack Neutron: Configuring L3 HA

Networking

Overview

In this article we will look at how to setup L3 HA in OpenStack Neutron. OpenStack networking can be rather complex, certainly when coming from a traditional networking world. The basic principles behind networking have not changed but OpenStack introduces lots of abstractions that make end-to-end visibility of network traffic flows very difficult to follow. As such before we get into the material it would be good to provide an overview of L3 as it pertains to OpenStack Neutron.
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